Waterfalls waterfalls and more waterfalls

...Did I mention waterfalls? As I continue on my race to visit, photograph, map and write about one hundred waterfalls across New England, I'm continually challenged to think of creative ways to capture these simple wonders of nature in unique ways...and to do so quickly, because there are always more waterfalls to visit.

Emerson falls, just below a dam in Saint Johnsbury, VT shows you don't need to be out in the wilderness to capture the beautiful movement of water. The shutter speed of 1/5 of a second blurs the water enough to create smooth lines, yet is of short enough duration to maintain the feeling of movement with little lines of spray clearly distinguishable.

As I'm visiting most of these waterfalls alone, I look for any opportunity to capture people in my waterfall photos. Usually that involves a quick shutter speed. Luckily here I was able to do a long exposure on the tripod, and the fisherman remained still enough to remain sharp. Wadsworth Big Falls, Middletown, CT.

Although most would argue that spring is the best time to capture waterfalls, shooting in low water allows access to shooting locations that would otherwise be too dangerous to go. Here's my first public shot with my new Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 at 11mm. For an inexpensive lens, it's actually pretty darn good. Moss Glen Falls, Stowe, VT.

Here is another example of the power of photography, and it's ability to show the truth in unique ways. I was racing to get this final shot in before it was totally dark. I shot this deep in the woods at 8:10pm, a good twenty minutes after sunset. It was so dark in fact, that I had to use my headlamp to get back to the car. Yet by exposing this for thirty seconds, the camera sensor can absorb more light that we can see and renders the photo virtually day-light. Terrill Gorge, Morristown, VT.

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